Rocketpunk Alternate Prints

Two of these images from the Greenbank Radio Astronomy site have been printed before on a different paper and appear in earlier postings. It’s interesting to compare how the lith developer chemistry interacts with the emulsions of different papers to create radically different effects on the same image. (Click on the “rocketpunk” tag at the bottom of the post to compare this with older versions)

The images in this post were made with Moersch Easy Lith developer on Arista EDU RC paper. In the earlier images they were made using the same developer but printed on Fomatone MG Classic paper. The former usually results in a very high contrast, super grainy and gritty image with a slight yellow-pinkish hue to the highlights, while the latter gives me a smoother, dreamier image with more of a brownish-pinkish color, with out-of-focus areas progressing to heavier grain.

As a result I tend to choose different papers for different types of images depending on what type of atmosphere I want to portray.

As manufacturers tend to start or stop producing certain papers without notice it can be tough to find good papers for lith printing sometimes. Some years ago my favorite lith paper was made by Kentona, but they stopped making it suddenly and so I had to search for new options. Many common papers such as Ilford Multigrade or the old Kodak paper (if you find any) simply do not work with lith developer at all and are only suitable for standard black and white printing, so searching the net for advice while experimenting with various brands and models is necessary.

And the same goes for lith chemicals…

Rocketpunk Collections

Image

This is a partial collection of what I call my “rocketpunk” series: an ongoing series of photos which share the common theme of the dream of spaceflight, exploration, and the “future that might’ve been” had the dreams of the 1960s carried on according to then-current predictions. Photos of real objects and artifacts that prompt one to imagine a sort of lost golden age of spaceflight, much as antique photos of airships or Jules Verne book cover art might.

Some of these photos are of actual aircraft, spacecraft and launch vehicles or engines, while other videos are of observatories used to study the sky.

 

Griffith Observatory, Los Angeles

Delta upper stage with satellite payload and aerodynamic shroud, Goddard Spaceflight Center, MD

Delta launch vehicle, Goddard Spaceflight Center, MD

Sounding rocket, Goddard Spaceflight Center, MD

Radio Telescope, Greenbank Observatory, WV

Radio Telescope, Greenbank Observatory, WV

Radio Telescope, Greenbank Observatory, WV

Radio Telescope, Greenbank Observatory, WV

Radio Telescope, Greenbank Observatory, WV. This 300 ft wide dish is the largest steerable radio telescope in the world.

Radio Telescope, Greenbank Observatory, WV. This 300 ft wide dish is the largest steerable radio telescope in the world.

Apollo Command Module, Goddard Spaceflight Center, MD. lith print version 1

Sounding Rocket, Goddard Spaceflight Center, MD

Sounding Rocket, Goddard Spaceflight Center, MD

Jet Engine of a Boeing 707, Smithsonian Air & Space Museum Udvar Hazy Center, VA

Rocketdyne F1 Rocket Engine, Udvar Hazy Center, VA. Five of these enormous engines powered the first stage of the Saturn V launch vehicle.

Rocketdyne RS-25 Space Shuttle Main Engine, Udvar Hazy Center, VA. The Space Shuttle was powered by three of these extremely efficient reusable engines.

Delta Launch Vehicle Propulsion System Detail, Goddard Spaceflight Center, MD

Apollo Command Module, Goddard Spaceflight Center, MD. lith print version 2